Categories
government Money Island redevelopment

How to Have Effective Conversations

This post is adapted from healthebiker.com. When we’re faced with differing opinions, we feel like others are challenging our identity. Money Island has long been a focal point in the differences between individuals and government and differences between users of different backgrounds and interests. Yet we’ve also made significant progress in addressing these differences and look forward to more of this ahead. So first off, do what you can to make sure your conversational partner feels respected. 

Tip 1: Listen to Understand, Not Respond

Most of the time when we argue, we listen to respond. If you’re planning your response while the other person talks, you’re listening to respond. 
Instead, let your conversational partner finish their point. Then repeat their ideas to show you’re listening. Most likely, this action will catch them off guard. When people feel listened to and respected, they’re more likely to reciprocate.

Tip 2: Do an Activity

It’s easier to have hard conversations if there’s something we can do to distract ourselves. So when you want to talk politics, find something else to do too. Go Fishing. Go to a bar and play pool. Enjoy the health benefits of a boat ride. The point is, find a way to stay busy. Let the conversation have natural lulls and pauses. Incorporating an activity makes this easier.

Tip 3: Start With the Similarities Between Us

There are a lot of similarities between us, whether democrats and republicans. Here are a few of them. At the very least, there are some political topics where we already share similar footing. 
Both democrats and republicans are worried about our deteriorating fisheries. They’re also worried about the rising cost of enjoying the bay. Try starting your conversation with questions on common interests like “What do you think would be the best way to restore our fish stocks?” Then hear your conversational partner out. Pick some points you agree on, and share your thoughts. 
By starting on similar ground, you’re more likely to have a friendly, open conversation.

Tip 4: Don’t Try to Change Minds, But Promote Discussion

Of course, you want to get someone else to share your beliefs. That’s human nature. But remember they share the same desire. When you talk politics, don’t try to change their opinion. 
Try to understand where they’re coming from. This will make you more informed about your own opinions, and it will open more space where we can share our ideas.

Tip 5: Planning A Meetup

Once public gathering restrictions are lifted and people feel safe, Money Island has a long history of hosting community get togethers. We plan to make the most of it. 

Categories
redevelopment sustainability

Baysave Recognized as a New Jersey Sustainable Business

Small businesses across New Jersey are starting to save money, share their successes and inspire other businesses by implementing sustainable business best practices. Joining this list of small businesses, Baysave located in Millville, New Jersey, became one of the first businesses in the state to be recognized as a New Jersey Sustainable Business.

In August of 2014, the New Jersey Small Business Development Centers (NJSBDC) launched the New Jersey Sustainable Business Registry. The registry is an Internet site where businesses that have implemented sustainable business practices can register their achievements and be recognized.

Baysave first achieved recognition for work stabilizing the bayshore community of Money Island. Their living shoreline stabilization efforts resulted in the reduction of erosion that resulted in substantial savings of dry land. Recent efforts include coordination of government programs and commercial fishing operations to promote economic stability.

Baysave’s business listing and programming records are available at http://registry.njsbdc.com/business-profile/459/483/baysave .

For more information about the registry visit: http://registry.njsbdc.com/
For more information about Baysave Association visit: www.baysave.org

Categories
aquaculture investment redevelopment sustainable redevelopment

Qualified Opportunity Zones vs. Qualified Small Business Stock at the bayshore

Community redevelopment or industry revitalization plans historically rely heavily on tax incentives to attract investment. Our local fisheries and aquaculture industries are likely to require large commitments of investment capital over the coming decades. A government program that abates taxes or exempts gains from taxation can make a project significantly more interesting to investors. Such programs can exist at the local, county, state and federal government level. This blog post focuses on the two most prominent options available at the federal level for the revitalization of the New Jersey bayshore. This blog does not attempt to explain each option, but rather focuses on the differences between them and briefly lists how I see each of them contributing to the bayshore community’s long term revitalization.

The first federal incentive programs are the Qualified Opportunity Zone authorized as part of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This program is geographically restricted to a few blocks in downtown Millville and large parts of Bridgeton. Advisers see this program as most attractive to larger investors.  This program could primarily help us with commercial real estate projects in those locations, especially equipment manufacturing and seafood processing, and aquaculture equipment financing for the region. This is the investment format being considered by some institutional investors. More information is available on this new web site.

The second program is Qualified Small Business Stock. This has been around longer as Section 1202 of the Internal Revenue Code but its attractiveness is strengthened by a series of recent tax changes. Investments may provide immediate tax benefits. The long term attraction is that smaller investors can achieve tax-free gains of up to $10 million (or more) by committing to the investment for at least five years. This is the business format that will be used by Nantuxent Corporation for the revitalization of commercial fishing and aquaculture at Money Island.

There are risks with either program. The first risk is that the investment may not achieve the gains expected. The investments could lose money. The second is that the investment might not be liquid at the time the investor wants to cash in. The third risk is that the expected tax result may not be achieved either because tax laws change or because the management of the investment did not meet the legal requirements of the incentive program.

I am happy to discuss how either option might fit into your investment plans.